Working with Communities to Improve Health

The following excerpt comes from an article that first appeared May 1, 2017, on the NIMHD website under NIMHD Community Health and Population Sciences Feature Articles


Improving health is not always a matter of prescribing the right medicine. Sometimes the environment needs to change. Many Americans live in neighborhoods that lack safe walking routes, grocery stores, and health facilities.

“Are there places for kids to play? Are there good farmers markets or grocery stores?” asks Irene Dankwa-Mullan, M.D., M.P.H., formerly of NIMHD and now deputy chief health officer of IBM Watson Health. Such features help people in a neighborhood live healthier lives. Along with NIMHD director Eliseo Pérez-Stable, Dr. Dankwa-Mullan wrote an editorial in the April 2016 issue of the American Journal of Public Health, “Addressing Health Disparities Is a Place-Based Issue.”

Efforts to address these problems in particular communities are called “place-based interventions.” Ideally, these interventions come from a collaboration among community members, businesses, and other stakeholders, working together with police, urban planners, and other groups to improve their neighborhood. Community members are involved to make sure the interventions are based on their values.

Examples of place-based interventions include an effort to bring a farmers market to a neighborhood without a grocery store or promoting public safety so that residents feel safe walking on the street. Walking is a simple way to improve health, but there can be many barriers to walking, a fact highlighted in the Surgeon General’s Call to Action on walking.

Place-based interventions have been used successfully in rural areas, disadvantaged urban neighborhoods, and Indian reservations. People who live in such places tend to have particular health problems, such as diabetes and heart disease, and working to change the place-based conditions may help address health disparities.

Communities are complicated, and figuring out the best way to improve the health of all residents in a particular place can be a daunting task. “Part of the issue is that we do not have a best practices model for place-based interventions,” Dr. Dankwa-Mullan says. The editorial in the American Journal of Public Health was part of a new series on best practices for place-based interventions. Through this series, public health professionals will be able to learn how to develop place-based interventions.

One key to success of place-based interventions is involving the community. This is similar to community-based participatory research, a way of doing research in which the community sets priorities, ensuring that communities that are asked to participate in research get answers to the questions that are most important to them.

Read the full article.

 

Partnerships for Better Health Outcomes

In June, the Partnership for Healthy Outcomes: Bridging Community-Based Human Services and Healthcare issued the report “Working Together Toward Better Health Outcomes” detailing the findings from a national request for information that sought information about partnerships between healthcare organizations and community-based organizations (CBOs).  The data came from 200 respondents to the request for information with 67% of respondents from CBOs, 13% from healthcare organizations, and 9% from government agencies. The remaining respondents represented foundations, research institutions, consulting organizations, and for-profit CBOs. Responses came from all 50 states while California, New York, Colorado, Pennsylvania, and Minnesota were the most represented.

The following key findings come from the report’s executive summary.

  • There’s no one-size-fits-all formula: Respondents represented partnerships of many sizes, shapes, and contractual and funding arrangements; many were among healthcare providers and CBOs – but partners also included public health and other government agencies, private insurers, foundations, schools, supermarkets, and more.
  • Shared goals provide common ground: Most of the responding partnerships were initiated by CBOs and noted the value of developing shared goals to improve health outcomes and contain or reduce costs.
  • Most partnerships have some sort of formal agreement in place, though partner integration varied from communicating (sharing client information) to coordinating (aligning services toward better client outcomes) to collaborating (sharing staff, space, or resources) to integrating (becoming a collective entity with connected programs, planning, and funding).
  • Most commonly, partnerships provided services to impact immediate-term clinical needs, such as reducing hospital admissions or length of stay. This may be due, at least in part, to a funding environment with incentives for cost reduction. More than half of respondents reported that their partnerships include care coordination support to better organize services across multiple providers; fewer partnerships reported providing services that address underlying social determinants to improve health in the long-term. A majority (65%) of partnerships reported realizing cost savings.
  • Partnerships rely on an evolving variety of funding sources, including private foundations, healthcare systems, and government entities, and typically more than one. A number of partnerships were established through a one-time grant and have developed – or are developing – a long-term, sustaining funding model.
  • Nearly all organizations acknowledged expanding skills and capacities through partnership, particularly in network-building, improving programs, and generating new funding.
  • Advancing the field will require partners and funders to:1)Prioritize and invest time in relationship-building – the key ingredient to effectiveness; 2)Engage a wide range of stakeholders, including community members, early on and throughout the partnership; 3)Identify and fund the full cost of partnership to effectively support development and evolution; 4)Stay adaptable and nimble in an ever-shifting environment.

To learn more, download the full report.

The Messenger Also Matters: Value-Based Payment Can Support Outreach To Vulnerable Populations

 

The following excerpt comes from the July 10, 2017 article by Ruth C. Browne, Marilyn Fraser, Judith Killen, and Laura Tollen on the Health Affairs Blog.


With the proliferation of value-based payment initiatives and implementation of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA’s) coverage expansions, states have had many opportunities in recent years to improve the health of vulnerable populations through health promotion, prevention, and care coordination. We believe value-based payment models can and must support accountable health care delivery systems in partnering with community-based “messengers” to engage vulnerable individuals in health education and promotion. We explore one such messenger program, ACCESS, a Brooklyn-based project of the Arthur Ashe Institute for Urban Health, which trains barbers and hairstylists to help formerly incarcerated men learn to recognize and act upon their own health risk factors. Value-based payment offers an opportunity to support programs such as this.

“Messengers,” as we define them here, are community health workers—those who serve “as a liaison/link/intermediary between health/social services and the community to facilitate access to services and improve the quality and cultural competence of service delivery.” Unfortunately, there are few dedicated funding streams available to support the messenger role. Fee-for-service payment arrangements do not reimburse these activities. Value-based payment, on the other hand, not only highlights the need to support messengers but also potentially provides funding to do so.

Value-based payment programs hold the health care delivery system accountable for meeting health goals for entire enrolled or attributed populations, which requires more than just providing better medical care. Shortfalls in medical care are responsible for only an estimated 10 percent of early mortality in the United States, while individual health-related behavior is responsible for 40 percent. Even the finest delivery system can only expect to see a modest improvement in the health of its community if it focuses only on the very thing it has been designed to do—providing medical care to sick people. Value-based payment requires delivery systems to redefine nothing less than their product, place, and providers. The product must be health; the place must be where people live and work; and the providers must include credible, community-based messengers.

Credible messengers can bring to delivery systems important knowledge about social determinants of health that impact individuals’ ability to access and act upon health-related information. We focus here on one social determinant—incarceration. Individuals formerly incarcerated have become eligible for Medicaid in large numbers and, as such, participate in a variety of value-based payment initiatives. New York State, where the ACCESS program has been implemented, is moving aggressively toward value-based payment in Medicaid. In 2015, the state announced its intention to shift 80–90 percent of its Medicaid managed care provider payments from fee-for-service to value-based arrangements by 2020.

In the United States, nearly 700,000 state and federal prisoners are released annually, and more than 11 million cycle through local jails. Incarcerated individuals have poorer physical health status than the rest of the population, a high burden of mental health and substance abuse disorders, and, once they are released, are more likely than the general population to be uninsured. However, under the ACA, more than one-third of inmates released annually from state and federal prisons are estimated to be Medicaid-eligible. If this pattern holds true for those released from local jails as well, there are potentially millions of formerly incarcerated individuals newly eligible for Medicaid—and for the value-based payment initiatives that may come with it.

The burdens of incarceration are distributed unevenly. Sixty percent of New York State prisoners come from New York City, and two-thirds of the 28,000 people released each year return to the city. Some Brooklyn neighborhoods have especially high incidences of incarceration and concomitant prison spending, earning them the dubious honorific of “million-dollar blocks,” even though they are among the poorest neighborhoods in Brooklyn.

At the Arthur Ashe Institute for Urban Health (AAIUH), we found a striking overlap between Brooklyn’s million-dollar blocks and areas where we were already engaged in health-promotion activities. Founded in 1992, the AAIUH is an independent, nonprofit organization that collaborates with community members to incubate, test, and replicate neighborhood-based interventions to improve health conditions disproportionately affecting minorities. Arthur Ashe, a world-renowned African American tennis champion and social justice advocate, founded the AAIUH in partnership with the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center. Using community-based participatory research, the AAIUH navigates disparate worlds—the institutional universe of academic medicine and day-to-day life in multi-ethnic, multi-linguistic neighborhoods.

Among other projects, the AAIUH has a long history of training barbers and hairstylists to deliver health education related to breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, asthma, and diabetes in women, and HIV/AIDS and prostate cancer in men. When we began the ACCESS program in 2009, exploratory work revealed that more than 80 percent of barbers working in our ongoing projects had themselves spent at least one night in jail. This made them particularly credible messengers for our priority population of formerly incarcerated men and the supportive women in their lives. Guided by input from a community-based advisory board, we conducted focus groups of barbers, stylists, and customers to determine the best way to discuss incarceration and health, and which health issues would be most important to the community. Based on that input, the program emphasized cardiovascular disease, stress, and HIV/AIDS. We developed a health curriculum to increase awareness of these conditions, emphasizing prevention and the importance of “knowing your numbers”—that is, understanding health indicators such as blood pressure and cholesterol levels. The curriculum included a resource guide for community health and social services related to the priority conditions and services for the re-entry population.

We trained barbers and stylists to deliver the curriculum in six establishments in the Bedford-Stuyvesant and Crown Heights areas of Brooklyn, emphasizing that health messages must be delivered in a way that could be useful to any member of the community who might know someone who had been incarcerated, instead of focusing solely on the formerly incarcerated themselves. In addition to the health messages and the resource guide, ACCESS included an HIV-focused health education video played several times a day in participating salons and barbershops and 12 AAIUH-sponsored Health Resource Days held at these establishments.

The project evaluation consisted of pre- and post-intervention surveys of patrons. The pre-intervention survey assessed patrons’ familiarity with risk factors, prevention, and resources related to the priority conditions. For example, patrons were asked multiple-choice questions such as: “What are some of the warning signs of a heart attack? What is a normal blood pressure reading?” The post-intervention survey of the same individuals sought to determine whether they had been exposed to the intervention and whether their knowledge regarding any of the previously asked questions had changed. Survey respondents’ ability to identify ways to assess their cardiovascular disease risk increased from 44 percent to 62 percent, and understanding that condom use can decrease the spread of HIV increased from 77 percent to 88 percent.

Read the full article.

Glimpses of Community Engagement

Community engagement calls for cultural humility, patience, and the building of authentic relationships. In a series of short videos from the Division of Community Engagement at Virginia Commonwealth University, faculty members describe their personal experiences of working with community partners. The six videos discuss:

  • Why community engagement?
  • Cultural competencies
  • Community partners as co-educators
  • The nontraditional learning script
  • Why I identify as a community-engaged scholar
  • Breaking Down Silos

The videos are all available on YouTube.

CAB Member Profile: Reverend Michael Johnson

 

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Reverend Michael Johnson

The Sentinel Surveillance to Monitor Progress toward Health Equity project aims to develop and implement a surveillance system to capture the information necessary to monitor progress towards health equity for health disparate populations. One key element of this project is the engagement of community members through a Community Advisory Board (CAB).  Recently, Reverend Michael Johnson, pastor of Faith Lutheran Church in Mobile, shared a little about his experiences with the CAB.

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself and your background.

I was born in Mobile and attended local public schools. After high school, I attended Bishop State Community College and, then, the University of South Alabama where I studied Civil and Structural Engineering. I completed my Master of Divinity at Concordia Theological Seminary in Fort Wayne, IN.  Before my pastorate here in Mobile, I pastored churches in Detroit, Birmingham, Memphis, and Baltimore.

How did you become involved with the Community Advisory Board for the Sentinel Surveillance Project?

I became involved by request of a previous [research office] employee, Andrea Hudson. She was aware of my years of community activism and involvement in providing initiatives for change.

Why did you decide to become part of the CAB?

We need to address the health disparities that cause much brokenness in our communities.  Participation in the CAB offers an opportunity to participate in important research that helps us understand these disparities and help mend the brokenness in our community.

Give us a few highlights of your time as a CAB member. Is there any one memory that stands out?

I appreciate the meetings, brainstorming ideas for effective health change, workshops and collaborating with others of the interest. If I had to identify a single memory/experience that has piqued my interest the most, that would be my recommendation and participation in the Bayou Health Disparity Fellows Program, of which I graduated May 9, 2017.

What community needs are you most concerned about?

Health Disparity change, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, drugs and alcohol addictions.

How do you see the sentinel surveillance project addressing these issues in the community?

Specifically, Dr. Arrieta’s sharing of information discovered through the research and community experience helps to educate also. Because of her personal interactions, it allows us to build relationships that are loving and caring for one another.

Have you ever been involved in research before, if so how is this similar or different?

I have been involved with research before on the data collection side. I desire to extend my interest is collaborating in academic, clinical trials and community samples through education and photovoice.

What have you learned about research through this process?

I learned that there are many causes of Health Disparity. There are also, needs and means for change, including policy change that would dissolve determinants causes.

Has the experience changed the way you consider or approach research in other areas of your life?

Yes, my viewpoint has changed tremendously. I am better educated and more motivated to be involved in the partnership and seeking means for health change for self and community.

Would you encourage others people in your life to participate in or be a part of leading/shaping research projects as a result of your involvement with Sentinel Surveillance?”

Yes, would definitely as I am encouraging others to get involved, get educated, participate and share in the movement of better health – better life.

CAB Member Profile: Rev. Roy Powell

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Rev. Roy Powell speaking at a CAB meeting.

The Sentinel Surveillance to Monitor Progress toward Health Equity project aims to develop and implement a surveillance system to capture the information necessary to monitor progress towards health equity for health disparate populations. One key element of this project is the engagement of community members through a Community Advisory Board (CAB). Recently, Reverend Roy Powell, a community leader, business owner, and member of the CAB, shared a little about his experiences of participating in a research project for the first time.

Tell us a little bit about yourself and your background.

I was born and reared in the Trinity Gardens community here in Mobile. I graduated high school from what was then Trinity Garden’s High school and went to Grambling on a music scholarship. After graduation, I came home, got married and had my children. Spent my working life at International paper and now own a clothing store on Spring Hill Avenue.

I now live in Crichton just ten blocks from where I was born and I love this community. I enjoy the outdoors so I’m always outside and see what’s happening.  I started planting trees and became known as the tree man. This led to my neighbors asking me to take on leadership in our block association to help make improvements in the community.

How did you become involved with the Community Advisory Board for the Sentinel Surveillance Project?

My introduction to the CAB was through Andrea Hudson [former research assistant with the Sentinel Surveillance Project]. I knew her through my work with the community organization I’m a part of. She also went to high school with my oldest daughter. From that relationship, I learned what the project was about and want to be a part of it.

Why did you decide to become part of the CAB?

As I said, my work in the community motivated me to be a part of the CAB. This is a valuable little community and has a lot of potential. So after getting involved and hearing the goals and seeing the investment in the community, I wanted to be a part of it. The greatest asset in a community is the people. And with this project, I saw concern for the people; a genuine desire to help the community.

Give us a few highlights of your time as a CAB member. Is there any one memory that stands out?

The most interesting experience was the Community Campus Partnership conference held in New Orleans in 2016. Our team went to present the experience and represent the larger community. People at that conference were from all over the United States and Canada. Their response was very encouraging. They were interested in what we were doing even though they had their own projects and work.

What community needs are you most concerned about?

Health needs. I’m avid about health. I run across so many people — some who are not as old as I am –whose health is not up to par. And, people are the most valuable part of a community. It’s not the buildings or anything else. It’s the people. So, health awareness is probably the greatest need.

How do you see the sentinel surveillance project addressing these issues in the community?

I believe knowledge is power. I know that’s an old adage but it’s true. I believe that knowing better will help the community do better. Just make a few people aware and maybe we can get people living better health wise. Once the research is presented, it can’t help but make a difference.

My hope is that by sharing this information young people will take notice and advocate in their homes, schools in the environment to do better.

Have you ever been involved in research before, if so how is this similar or different?

No. This is my first experience with research.

What have you learned about research through this process?

I learned you can determine the needs of people in the community by simply asking. It usually takes effort for people to get the assistance but if they are not aware of what’s available they can never get it. I didn’t know how we could reach the population in this community but this research really can help when it’s disseminated.

Has the experience changed the way you consider or approach research in other areas of your life?

I haven’t seen research as a part of life. I never realized how great a part research could play in meeting the needs of the community.  Before, I always considered research to be pointless. But now I see that the information gained will help be beneficial.

Would you encourage others people in your life to participate in or be a part of leading/shaping research projects as a result of your involvement with Sentinel Surveillance?

I would definitely. It has been a source of enlightenment for me.  I just want to encourage the group to keep working and press forward.

CAB Member Profile: Mr. John Jones

The Sentinel Surveillance to Monitor Progress toward Health Equity project aims to develop and implement a surveillance system to capture the information necessary to monitor progress towards health equity for health disparate populations. One key element of this project is the engagement of community members through a Community Advisory Board (CAB).  Recently, Mr. John Jones, a member of the Trinity Gardens community and a member of the CAB, shared a little about his experiences with the CAB.

Tell us a little bit about yourself and your background.

I was born in Chatom, AL, but moved to Mobile in 1947. I first moved to Trinity Gardens in 1949. After high school, I spent four years in the Air Force. Living in South Dakota, I attended the School of Mines in Rapid City. After leaving the Air Force, I returned to Trinity Gardens, graduated from Bishop State.  I spent the next 28 years working for the railroad. I’m now retired and have time to do more in the community.

How did you become involved with the Community Advisory Board for the Sentinel Surveillance Project?

My pastor, Rev. Ulmer Marshall at Trinity Lutheran Church, was involved with the group. He had to step back from the commitment and asked me if I would attend in his place. I came to check it out. I wanted to see if it was something that I could really contribute to. I thought it was worthwhile so became a part of the group.

Why did you decide to become part of the CAB?

I wanted to share my life experience with the community and with the CAB. If I could contribute to something that would help someone improve their health, I wanted to do that.

Give us a few highlights of your time as a CAB member. Is there any one memory that stands out?

I would say the surveys that were taken. Particularly, I was instrumental in going to places and talking with business owners about the project about allowing the team to conduct surveys on their property. They were so congenial and open to helping. I was surprised. They will still ask how things are going and how they can help.

I have learned some things from the areas I’ve been in and the people I’ve talked with. I didn’t realize how many people don’t have insurance and don’t see a doctor until an emergency happens. I guess I saw it but didn’t see it.

What community needs are you most concerned about?

I’m mostly concerned about the lack of medical assistance available in my community. This includes a lack of education on illness, how do avoid different illnesses, and how to manage their disease if they to get sick. The lack of [health] education means people don’t take health seriously.

Over my life, I’ve watched people with diabetes who only had a torso when they were buried. Their limbs had been amputated. Also, people don’t know that they can lead a good life with Diabetes. Many think it is a death sentence. I’m seeing younger and younger people who say they have High Blood Pressure. Being retired, I now have the time to pay more attention to my surroundings.

In a project like this, we can see the problems and how people fall through the cracks. This work allows us to create a catch basin.

How do you see the sentinel surveillance project addressing these issues in the community?

Hopefully, improve the areas where the data has been collected. I like to think this project will address the issues. I have been asked how long are you going to collect data, when are you going to do something. If I didn’t believe in it, I wouldn’t be sitting here.

Have you ever been involved in research before, if so how is this similar or different?

No, I had no research experience before participating in this project.

What have you learned about research through this process?

I’ve learned that people are embarrassed to be honest about their health. I’ve learned that we can’t put people on the defensive when we talk to them about these issues and ask questions. I guess I’ve learned humility. I’ve never been known to have much patience. Now, I can look beyond a “fault” and understand how to help.

I’ve learned that some people can’t help themselves because they don’t know how. This has taught me to reach out and help them on their own terms.

Would you encourage others people in your life to participate in or be a part of leading/shaping research projects as a result of your involvement with Sentinel Surveillance?

Yes, I would but I would be cautious. You have to be careful of people who want to make a big name for themselves and are not really focused on helping the community.

HDRG Recap: “From Charity to Justice: Optimizing the Impact of Service Learning and Community Service”

The final Health Disparities Research Group (HDRG) meeting for the 2016-2017 academic year was held Friday, May 19th. Dr. Erik Goldschmidt, the Director of the Foley Community Service Center at Spring Hill College (Foley Center) was the presenter. Dr. Goldschmidt described the integral role community service plays in the mission of Spring Hill College and the ways in which the Foley Center advances community service efforts by supporting the volunteer work of nearly 50% of the student body each year.

The Foley Center administers service learning courses for many of the departments at Springhill. Service learning classes must provide students with opportunities for authentic interaction with community groups and the individuals they serve. Springhill strives to ensure that these authentic interactions result in student experiences that are characterized by substantial and sustained onsite service to local non-profit, direct-service organizations. This interaction focuses on building relationships which then become the vehicle for student development of self-knowledge, awareness of others, and systems thinking.

In addition, Dr. Goldschmidt discussed the Foley Center’s plans for future growth. A core principle driving the next phase of development is the goal of facilitating systemic engagement that advances beyond charitable work to justice oriented action. The College intends to support students as they work alongside partners to solve real-world problems. Ultimately the expectation is that there will be a “reciprocal learning process” that will improve the community while supporting students in their academic and spiritual journey.

The Foley Center is also exploring ways to bring community members on to the Spring Hill College campus for authentic interactions. One approach is “college exposure” days for students from area middle and high schools. More than a campus tour, the exposure day is designed for two way interaction between the 25 visiting students and approximately 70 faculty, staff and students involved with the group throughout the day. The day also provides for cooperative learning activities in the classes.

Another approach to bringing the community into the campus is a semester focus on one community partner. The partner organization’s leadership and staff can visit the campus, interact with students, and speak in various classes. The interaction includes asking, “what more could we be doing with you.”

Throughout his presentation, Dr. Goldschmidt stressed the potential for personal development of students of service learning, while reinforcing the need to authentically engage with partners with respect and humility.

 

CAB Member Profile: Leevones Fisher

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Mrs. Leevones Fisher speaking at the CHC Community-Engagement forum in January 2017.

The Sentinel Surveillance to Monitor Progress toward Health Equity project aims to develop and implement a surveillance system to capture the information necessary to monitor progress towards health equity for health disparate populations. One key element of this project is the engagement of community members through a Community Advisory Board (CAB). Recently, Mrs. Leevones Fisher, a community activist and member of the CAB, shared a little about her reasons for participating in the CAB and the importance of continued investment in research.

Tell us a little bit about yourself and your background.

I grew up in the Trinity Gardens community of Mobile, AL. My family of nine consisted of mom, dad, and six siblings. After attending school at Trinity Lutheran School and graduating from Trinity Gardens High School, I did undergraduate studies at Talladega College where I majored in chemistry with a minor in math. After receiving my degree, I moved to Atlanta, GA, to teach school for five years. I returned to Mobile when my mother fell ill with cancer. I started working in Alabama, married and had one son. I’ve been in Mobile ever since.

I stared the Bay Area Women Coalition (BAWC)  in 1997 in response to the many problems with crime in the neighborhood. My brother had been murdered. The children of friends had been murdered. Crime in our community was bad at that time with police and service workers afraid to come into the neighborhood. As a result of the organizations advocacy and focus on improved housing, the crime rate has gone down. We’ve constructed 50 new homes and build two affordable housing subdivisions – with one made up of apartments for seniors. We’ve also renovated or repaired over 400 houses and are currently working with community gardens to improve access to healthy food.

How did you become involved with the Community Advisory Board for the Sentinel Surveillance Project?

It all started when I attended a workshop at Bishop State Community College 10 years ago. Dr. Crook and Dr. Arrieta came to the workshop to talk about health. I talked to them about health and how the university needs to be more involved with the community. The relationships shouldn’t be a one-way thing.

Why did you decide to become part of the CAB?

One reason I joined the CAB is I wanted to give my opinion on the neighborhood and what is happening as a community member. Being a apart of the group provided an opportunity to see things improve and grow; and I wanted to monitor the growth of the impact the project would have on the community.

Give us a few highlights of your time as a CAB member. Is there any one memory that stands out?

One thing that stands out is when I got the chance to go to the national conference and meet others from across the country and share during the poster session. It was an eye-opening experience to find out that so many people were interested in what we are doing.

What community needs are you most concerned about?

Health is a big concern, especially women’s health. Most of the women in our community are the heads of households and they are not in good health. When we don’t take care of ourselves, it means that we are not taking good care of our family.

How do you see the sentinel surveillance project addressing these issues in the community?

Poor housing is a big issue. But, I’ve learned that health is also one of the main issues. Poor housing and poor health go together. If people are not healthy, they don’t care about the housing part. They are just trying to get well. Health helps housing and housing helps health. The two go together. Poor health means that you can’t keep up your house.

Have you ever been involved in research before, if so how is this similar or different?

Yes has been involved in research before this project. I did a lot with with the College of Business, Dr. Semon Chang. He had us go door to door to do an assessment of the community, a housing assessment. With Dr. Ken Hudson, we tried to figure out why the housing and health issues were such a detriment in the neighborhood. Both surveys were done because we had gone out to find the information we needed to make a change on the housing issue. The impact was we learned that poor housing had an impact on health conditions. This led to trying to find out what could be done about health conditions.

What have you learned about research through this process?

It has to continue. When you start looking at one thing, you find something else that has to be addressed. We need to continue investing in research to address issues in the community with people. Housing work led to health research, and we learned that it is big and needs to be narrowed down to certain areas. There are so many issues with health, which is very different than housing. So we must continue researching to understand the issues and how they work together and how they can be addressed.

Has the experience changed the way you consider or approach research in other areas of your life?

Yes… keep researching looking at every facet from infancy to old age. Pick an age and you can research and find out so many fascinating facts about that age. Whether it is finance or spiritual needs,  there is so much that can be researched. I used to think of research as trying to find a cure for cancer or something. But, it is multifaceted.

Would you encourage others people in your life to participate in or be a part of leading/shaping research projects as a result of your involvement with Sentinel Surveillance?

I would. I would like for them to be a part of it not just because they are receiving something; but, because they want to see a different in their community. We need to research how this could happen. I think of President Kennedy saying, “Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.” This always resonated in my mind because most people when asked to participate in research want something in return.

Any final thoughts on research.

We need to keep the ball rolling because I don’t think the need for research will ever end.

 

Next HDRG Meeting

The Health Disparities Research Group (HDRG) is a multidisciplinary assembly of faculty, students, staff, and community representatives with a vision “to become an integral facilitator in eliminating health disparities through partnerships with our community.” Held the 3rd Friday of each month throughout the academic year, the meetings provide an opportunity to share research and cultivate a positive atmosphere for community-engagement in addressing health disparities.

The next meeting is May 19 at 1:00 pm in Bio-medical Library Room 222-A.  Dr. Erik Goldschmidt,  Director of the Foley Community Service Center at Springhill College, will share about their work in his presentation “From Charity to Justice: Optimizing the Impact of Service-Learning & Community Service”.

Please join us for the final HDRG meeting of this academic year.