Report: Systemic Discrimination Worsens Health Outcomes for Minority Boys and Men

The following excerpt comes from the June 18, 2018, article by Liz Entman in Research News @ Vanderbilt. Men in the United States tend to have more privilege, wealth and career success than women, yet they lead shorter and unhealthier lives. This reality is compounded for men of color and LGBTQI men, who have some … Continue reading Report: Systemic Discrimination Worsens Health Outcomes for Minority Boys and Men

Communicating the Value of Race and Ethnicity in Research

The following excerpt comes from the June 27, 2018, article by Dr. Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable from the NIH Website. Until recently, researchers assumed that what they learned about White male participants could be safely applied to anybody, regardless of gender, race, ethnicity or other variables. We now know that this isn’t true. When you’re communicating … Continue reading Communicating the Value of Race and Ethnicity in Research

New Publication: The Family Meal Challenge: A Faith-Based Intervention to Empower Families

A new article in the Journal of Christian Nursing from Dr. Sharon Fruh and colleagues highlights the outcomes from a family meal challenge that sought to empower individuals to eat healthy meals together as a family. The Family Meal Challenge (FMC) was presented through four classes in three churches, two faith-based ministries, and two community service … Continue reading New Publication: The Family Meal Challenge: A Faith-Based Intervention to Empower Families

Warning signs: New US health study reveals ‘dangerous disparities’ among states

The following excerpt comes from the April 10, 2018, press release on EurekaAlert!. Working-age Americans in 21 states faced a higher probability of premature death from 1990 to 2016, according to the most extensive state-by-state US health study ever conducted. The likelihood of early death for men and women age 20 to 55 is highest … Continue reading Warning signs: New US health study reveals ‘dangerous disparities’ among states

How Kids and Families Pay the Real Cost of Health Inequality

The following excerpt comes from the May 31, 2018, article by Michelle Chen in The Nation. When you’re too sick to go to work, you shouldn’t be punished for taking time to recover. That simple truth has driven many cities to enact paid leave policies in recent years, guaranteeing paid sick days, or some kind … Continue reading How Kids and Families Pay the Real Cost of Health Inequality

Study Finds Connecting Patients with Social Services to Address Social Determinants of Health Generates Double-Digit Reduction in Healthcare Spending

The following excerpt comes from the May 23, 2018, press release posted on PR Newswire. New research released by WellCare Health Plans, Inc. (NYSE: WCG) and the University of South Florida (USF) College of Public Health, Tampa, and published in Population Health Management, reports that healthcare spending is substantially reduced when people are successfully connected … Continue reading Study Finds Connecting Patients with Social Services to Address Social Determinants of Health Generates Double-Digit Reduction in Healthcare Spending

UAB, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Alabama announce plan to tackle state’s rural physician shortage

The following excerpt comes from the May 16, 2018, article written by Holly Gainer on UAB News. The majority of Alabama’s counties do not have enough primary care physicians to meet the needs of their residents. According to the federal definition of Health Professional Shortage Areas, 62 out of Alabama’s 67 counties are considered as … Continue reading UAB, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Alabama announce plan to tackle state’s rural physician shortage

A Different Kind of Public Health Message

The following excerpt comes from the May 3, 2018, article by Livia Gershon on JSTOR Daily. “Public health awareness” usually refers to campaigns with messages about quitting smoking or eating healthful foods, often aimed at the people who are most vulnerable to health threats. But four public health and communications specialists, Jeff Niederdeppe, Q. Lisa … Continue reading A Different Kind of Public Health Message

The Pipeline Program Looks Ahead to a Busy Summer

This year the STRIPES* program will open on June 4th with orientation at 7:45 am in the College of Medicine. Eleven students are continuing their journey of preparing for college and STEM careers through the program. Also, three STARS and STRIPES graduates currently attending college are participating in the Undergraduate research program. They have been … Continue reading The Pipeline Program Looks Ahead to a Busy Summer

New Publication Highlights CHC’s Community Engagement Core

An article recently published in a special issue of Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action describes the evolution of the Community Health Advocate (CHA) and STARS and STRIPES pipeline programs from separate, age-segregated programs to interconnected, multigenerational opportunities for promoting health equity. The article briefly provides an overview of the two programs … Continue reading New Publication Highlights CHC’s Community Engagement Core