HDRG Recap: Health Care Apartheid: Labor Markets, Race-Ethnicity, and Affordable Care

At the April 21, 2017, meeting of the Health Disparities Research Group (HDRG), Dr. Kenneth Hudson and his team presented findings from their research on the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) on insurance rates. This work is part of the research project The Impact of Labor Force/Labor Market  Status on Access to Health Care. The presentation focused on analysis of data from the  Current Population Survey (CPS).

Dr. Hudson began his talk by outlining the theoretical foundations of and major influences on his work. Citing the work of Dr. William Julius Wilson on race and labor markets and the work of Clayton and Byrd on the history of minority health disparities, Dr. Hudson outlined three eras in American history focusing on race and labor relations, and the provision of medical care. After the civil rights movement, institutions  such as hospitals couldn’t overtly discriminate on race, but they could, however, discriminate based on the ability to pay. Currently, the primary mechanism for covering the cost of health care in the United States is health insurance, which is usually provided by either an employer, family members, or a government program such as Medicare or Medicaid.

Within this context, Dr. Hudson relayed the findings from his team’s analysis of the health insurance data from the CPS. The findings reaffirmed what was already known; the ACA substantially reduced the rate of uninsured Americans. They also found that the expansion of Medicaid was the primary mechanism for this reduction, even though 19 states chose not to participate in the Medicaid expansion program..

Dr. Hudson and his team are currently preparing their findings for publication.

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