Sentinel Communities: Mobile, Alabama

The Sentinel Communities project — a part of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Culture of Health Initiative — will track health outcomes in 30 cities to understand

  • Local health care landscape
  • How challenges can be addressed in areas with different geographic and historic landscapes
  • How communities make progress or address barriers in improving population health.

The Sentinel Communities were chosen to reflect the nation’s diversity in terms of demographics, geography, and approaches to health. The following, drawn from the first report about Mobile, AL., provide some context for health issues in city.

 

  • In addition to an overall 25% poverty rate for Mobile, significant income inequality exists between black and white residents, with black households earning about half the median income as white ones.
  • While educational attainment has increased among white residents, the percentage of black residents with a bachelor’s degree or higher declined between 2010 and 2014.
  • Despite progress, Mobile residents have a lower life expectancy and higher rates of teen pregnancy, obesity, smoking, and uninsurance than the national average.
  • Even with the introduction of a new Regional Care Organization that may improve insurance coverage for residents, Mobile remains a federally designated health care shortage area.

 

See the full report for charts on indicators such as income, teen pregnancy, mortality, and educational attainment as well as some of the initiatives currently in place to address health issues.

 

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