September HDRG Recap: Sustaining Community Health Advocates for the Long-term

At the September 16, 2016, meeting of the Health Disparities Research Group, Ms. Sarah Wraight, graduate research assistant with the Center for Healthy Communities and Master’s candidate in the department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work, together with

Ms. Candis Patterson, Health Education Specialist with the Center for Healthy Communities, presented “Will they stay or will they go? Long term commitment to a community health advocacy program.” Based on interviews with the several of the longest serving  and currently active Community Health Advocates (CHA), their presentation explored the factors that allowed this group of CHAs to continue working with the Center for Healthy Communities through the more than 10 years of the program’s history.

In describing the elements that have contributed to their continued relationship with the CHC, Ms. Wraight and Ms. Patterson discussed their findings with special emphasis on three key themes:

  • Spirituality and Community Trust
    • Support provided by individual pastors and churches
    • Key church ministries where CHAs can plug in the health advocacy work
    • Churches provide gathering place considered trustworthy and safe, providing an open space for health education activities
  • Self and Collective Efficacy
    • Pride in being able to give to their own community
    • Desire to pass the torch along to other individuals to continue the work
  • Professionalism and Networking
    • Professionalism comes from the support of the University staff in training and providing assistance with CHA events
    • Meetings and program activities provide opportunities to meet and brainstorm ideas for future projects

Ms. Wraight and Ms. Patterson also explained that in addition to describing the factors that kept them connected to the program, the CHAs interviewed shared their goals for future health advocacy efforts.  The strongest themes regarding future CHA work included:

  • Developing more partnerships with organizations and institutions in Mobile
  • Moving into advocacy to directly influence policy change
  • Addressing mental health issues

The presentation was based on a poster presentation given by Ms. Wraight, Dr. Roma Hanks (Co-Director of the Community Engagement Core with the Center for Healthy Communities and Chair of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work), and Ms. Patterson at the Women’s Health Update Conference held at UAB in August. Dr. Hanks, who was unable to attend the HDRG meeting, has directed the CHA work for several years and designed the project methodology used for the research presented in the poster. They are currently drafting a manuscript to further detail their research on the continuity of the CHAs.

Read more about the work of the CHA program.

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